Pope St. Sixtus III

Pope St. Sixtus III
    Pope St. Sixtus III
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Pope St. Sixtus III
    (XYSTUS).
    Consecrated 31 July, 432; d. 440. Previous to his accession he was prominent among the Roman clergy and in correspondence with St. Augustine. He reigned during the Nestorian and Pelagian controversies, and it was probably owing to his conciliatory disposition that he was falsely accused of leanings towards these heresies. As pope he approved the Acts of the Council of Ephesus and endeavoured to restore peace between Cyril of Alexandria and John of Antioch. In the Pelagian controversy he frustrated the attempt of Julian of Eclanum to be readmitted to communion with the Catholic Church. He defended the pope's right of supremacy over Illyricum against the local bishops and the ambitious designs of Proclus of Constantinople. At Rome he restored the Basilica of Liberius, now known as St. Mary Major, enlarged the Basilica of St. Lawrence-Without-the-Walls, and obtained precious gifts from the Emperor Valentinian III for St. Peter's and the Lateran Basilica. The work which asserts that the consul Bassus accused him of crime is a forgery. He is the author of eight letters (in P.L., L, 583 sqq.), but he did not write the works "On Riches", "On False Teachers", and "On Chastity" ("De divitiis", "De malis doctoribus", "De castitate") attributed to him. His feast is kept on 28 March.
    DUCHESNE (ed.), Lib. Pont., I (Paris, 1886), 126-27, 232-37; BARMBY in Dict. Christ. Biog., s. v. Sixtus (3); GRISAR, History of Rome and the Popes, tr. CAPPADELTA, I (St. Louis, 1911), nos. 54, 135, 140, 144, 154.
    N.A. WEBER

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pope Sixtus III — Infobox Pope English name=Pope Sixtus III birth name=??? term start=July 31, 432 term end=August 18, 440 predecessor=Celestine I successor=Leo I birthplace=not known dead=dead|death date=death date|440|8|18|mf=y deathplace=Rome other=Sixtus|… …   Wikipedia

  • Pope St. Sixtus II —     Pope St. Sixtus II     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Pope St. Sixtus II     (XYSTUS).     Elected 31 Aug., 257, martyred at Rome, 6 Aug., 258. His origin is unknown. The Liber Pontificalis says that he was a Greek by birth, but this is probably a …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Sixtus III, Saint — ▪ pope also spelled  Xystus  born , Rome died Aug. 19, 440, feast day March 28       pope from 432 to 440.       A chief Roman priest when he succeeded Pope St. Celestine I on July 31, 432, Sixtus had previously been suspected of favouring… …   Universalium

  • Pope St. Sixtus I —     Pope St. Sixtus I     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Pope St. Sixtus I     Pope St. Sixtus I (in the oldest documents, Xystus is the spelling used for the first three popes of that name), succeeded St. Alexander and was followed by St. Telesphorus …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Sixtus III, Pope Saint — • Reigned 432 440 Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006 …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Sixtus III — Saint, pope A.D. 432 440. Also, Xystus III. * * * …   Universalium

  • Sixtus III — Saint, pope A.D. 432 440. Also, Xystus III …   Useful english dictionary

  • St. Sixtus III —     Pope St. Sixtus III     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Pope St. Sixtus III     (XYSTUS).     Consecrated 31 July, 432; d. 440. Previous to his accession he was prominent among the Roman clergy and in correspondence with St. Augustine. He reigned… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Pope Sixtus IV — Sixtus IV Papacy began August 9, 1471 Papacy ended August 12, 1484 (13 years, 3 days) Predecessor …   Wikipedia

  • Sixtus — was a Roman name, a corruption of the Greek name polytonic|Ξυστος, meaning polished, and originally Latinized Xystus. It is not to be confused with the common Roman name Sextus, meaning sixth, though not necessarily denoting a sixth child.… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.