Intrusion

Intrusion
The act by which unlawful possession of an ecclesiastical benefice is taken

Catholic Encyclopedia. . 2006.

Intrusion
    Intrusion
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Intrusion
    (Latin intrudere.)
    Intrusion is the act by which unlawful possession of an ecclesiastical benefice is taken. It implies, therefore, the ignoring of canonical institution, which is the reception of the benefice at the bands of him who has the right to bestow it by canon law. The necessity of proper canonical institution rests primarily on certain passages of the New Testament (John, x, 1; Hebr., v, 4), in which a legitimate mission from properly constituted authority in the Church is postulated. This is reaffirmed by the Council of Trent (Sess. XXIII, can. vii), and in the "Corpus Juris Canonici" it is decreed: "An ecclesiastical benefice may not be taken possession of without canonical institution" (cap. i, De reg. jur., in vi). Intrusion does not necessarily signify the employment of force in entering upon a benefice. To constitute him an intruder or usurper in the ecclesiastical sense, it is sufficient that the person has no true canonical title to the benefice when he takes possession. Historical examples of intrusion on a large scale are not wanting. To pass over the many violations of the Church's right during the investiture struggles of medieval times, we find wholesale intrusion practised in France in the reigns of Louis XIV and Napoleon I, when ecclesiastics, nominated to episcopal sees but whose elections were never confirmed by the pope, ruled the dioceses into which they were thus intruded. Pius IX, in his Constitution "Romanus Pontifex", decreed excommunication and privation of dignities against members of a cathedral chapel who hand over the administration of a diocese to one who, although nominated, has not yet presented his letters of canonical institution. When laymen have the right of presentation to a benefice, the confirmation of ecclesiastical authority is necessary before actual possession can be obtained. The nominee who does not wait for this canonical induction is an intruder.
    The definition is also extended to persons who, having been repelled even unjustly by their ecclesiastical superiors, seek the aid of the civil power to obtain possession under pretext of abuse. As an intruder has no true title to receive the revenues of the benefice which he uncanonically holds, he is bound in conscience to make restitution of what are ill-gotten gains to the lawful titular. Even if the latter die, it does not legalize the position of the intruder, for in that case the restitution must be made to the true titular's lawful successor in the benefice. To remove the irregularity incurred by intrusion,, the papal power must be invoked, as the censure is reserved to the Holy See. A dispensation from such an irregularity is the more difficult to obtain in proportion to the falsity of the title invoked or the employment of violence in entering on the benefice. Canonists also extend the term intrusion to the keeping possession of a benefice by a hitherto lawful possessor, after it has been vacated by violation of certain decrees of the Church. Thus, titulars of one benefice who fraudulently present themselves for examination in a concursus to obtain a benefice for another by impersonating him, who obtain a benefice for others on the understanding that they are to be rewarded for it, or who seek a benefice with the intention of resigning it to another with a secret provision that they are to receive a pension from its revenues, lose the right to their own benefices, which thus canonically become vacant. By retaining possession of them in such cases, they become intruders.
    CRAISSON. Manuale Totius Juris Canonici, I (Paris, 1899); FERRARIS, Bibliotheca Canonica, I (Rome, 1885), s.v. Beneficium; WERNZ, Jus Decretalium, II (Rome. 1899).
    WILLIAM H. W. FANNING
    Transcribed by Douglas J. Potter Dedicated to the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

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  • intrusion — [ ɛ̃tryzjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1304; lat. médiév. intrusio → intrus 1 ♦ Fait de s introduire, sans en avoir le droit, dans une charge, une dignité; dans une société, un groupe. Faire intrusion dans une réunion. Une intrusion intolérable. ⇒ incursion,… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Intrusion — (lat. engl.: Eindringen) bezeichnet: Eindringen Intrusion (Geologie), das Eindringen von fließfähigem Material (z. B. Magma) in bereits existierende Gesteinskörper Intrusion (Psychologie), in der Psychologie die unauslöschliche seelische Prägung… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Intrusión — puede referirse a: Intrusión, concepto fonológico correspondiente a la introducción de sonidos nuevos. Intrusión, fenómeno geológico. Enlaces externos Wikcionario tiene definiciones para intrusión.Wikcionario …   Wikipedia Español

  • intrusion — in·tru·sion /in trü zhən/ n 1 a: the entry at common law of a stranger after a particular estate of freehold is determined before the person who holds it in remainder or reversion has taken possession b: the act of wrongfully entering upon,… …   Law dictionary

  • Intrusion — In*tru sion, n. [Cf. F. intrusion. See {Intrude}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of intruding, or of forcing in; especially, the forcing (one s self) into a place without right or welcome; encroachment. [1913 Webster] Why this intrusion? Were not my… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intrusion — Intrusion. s. f. v. Action par laquelle on s introduit contre le droit ou la forme, dans quelque Charge, dans quelque Benefice. Intrusion violente. aprés son intrusion …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • intrusion — late 14c., from O.Fr. intrusion (14c.), from M.L. intrusionem (nom. intrusio) a thrusting in, noun of action from pp. stem of L. intrudere, from in in (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + trudere to thrust, push (see EXTRUSION (Cf. extrusion)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • intrusión — sustantivo femenino 1. (no contable) Acción de introducirse una persona en un lugar sin derecho o autorización: Fue detenido por un delito de intrusión …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

  • Intrusion — (lat.), das gewaltsame Eindringen der Eruptivgesteine zwischen andre Gesteine …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • intrusion — Intrusion, Occupatio grassatoria, non possessio, quae possidendi iure vacat, B …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

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