Renunciation

Renunciation
A canonical term signifying the resignation of an ecclesiastical office or benefice

Catholic Encyclopedia. . 2006.

Renunciation
    Renunciation
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Renunciation
    (Lat. renuntiare).
    A canonical term signifying the resignation of an ecclesiastical office or benefice. It may be defined as the abdication of a clerical dignity made freely and spontaneously, for just reasons, into the hands of the legitimate superior who accepts it. Generally speaking, any ecclesiastic may renounce his dignity whether his office be perpetual or temporal. To be valid, the resignation must be free, that is, not extorted by fear, or threats, or fraud. It must be made into the hands of the superior who had conferred it, that is of the pope for bishops and holders of major benefices; of the ordinary for parish priests and all incumbents of minor benefices. As to the pope himself, he may abdicate his dignity, but, as he has no earthly superior, his resignation must simply be declared canonically (see ABDICATION). Before a renunciation is canonically valid, it must be accepted by the legitimate superior, for otherwise it would work great detriment to the Church. Moreover, no one is at liberty to resign his office unless he is certain of revenues for his competent support. A resignation may be absolute or conditional. The latter term is used for renunciations that are made in favour of a third person, or with reservation of a pension, or when incumbents exchange benefices. The causes for which resignations are lawful are given in verse in the "Corpus juris canonici" (cap. x, "de renunt", 1, 9);
    Debilis, ignarus, male conscius, irregularis, Quem mala plebs odit, dans scandala, cedere possit.
    
    Therefore, one may justly resign on account of ill-health, want of proper knowledge, consciousness of guilt, clerical irregularity, ill-will of the people, or scandalous behavior.
    SMITH, Elements of Ecclesiastical Law, I (New York, 1895); TAUNTON, The Law of the Church (London, 1906), s. v. Resignation; SANGUINETTI, Juris ecclesiastici institutiones (Rome, 1896).
    WILLIAM H.W. FANNING
    Transcribed by WGKofron With thanks to St. Mary's Church, Akron, Ohio

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

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  • renunciation — re·nun·ci·a·tion /ri ˌnən sē ā shən/ n: the act or practice of renouncing; specif: the act of refusing to continue to acknowledge, recognize, or be bound by a contract or obligation: repudiation Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam… …   Law dictionary

  • renunciation — re‧nun‧ci‧a‧tion [rɪˌnʌnsiˈeɪʆn] noun [uncountable] FINANCE when an investor returns shares they have been offered to the company offering them: • The share certificate carries a form for renunciation on the reverse. * * * renunciation UK US… …   Financial and business terms

  • renunciation — renunciation, abnegation, self abnegation, self denial can all mean voluntary surrender or putting aside of something desired or desirable. Renunciation (see also under renounce at ABDICATE) commonly connotes personal sacrifice for a higher end… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Renunciation — Re*nun ci*a tion (r? n?n s? ? sh?n or sh? ? sh?n; 277), n. [Cf. F. renonciation, L. renuntiatio ann announcement. See {Renounce}.] 1. The act of renouncing. [1913 Webster] 2. (Law) Formal declination to take out letters of administration, or to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Renunciation — (v. lat. Renunciatio), 1) feierliche Ernennung eines Candidaten zu dem Amt, zu welchem er erwählt war, s. Comitia; 2) (R. matrimonii), Trennung der Ehe, wenn der Mann in seiner Abwesenheit der Frau einen Scheidebrief schickte; 3)… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • renunciation — late 14c., from L. renuntiationem (nom. renuntiatio), from renuntiatus, pp. of renuntiare renounce (see RENOUNCE (Cf. renounce)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • renunciation — [n] abandonment, rejection abdication, abjuration, abnegation, abstention, cancellation, denial, disavowal, disclaimer, eschewal, eschewing, forbearing, forswearing, giving up, rebuff, refusal, relinquishment, remission, renouncement, repeal,… …   New thesaurus

  • renunciation — ► NOUN ▪ the action or an act of renouncing …   English terms dictionary

  • renunciation — [ri nun΄sē ā′shən] n. [ME < L renuntiatio < renuntiatus, pp. of renuntiare: see RENOUNCE] 1. the act or an instance of renouncing; a giving up formally or voluntarily, often at a sacrifice, of a right, claim, title, etc. 2. a written… …   English World dictionary

  • renunciation — [[t]rɪnʌ̱nsie͟ɪʃ(ə)n[/t]] renunciations 1) N UNCOUNT: also N in pl The renunciation of a belief or a way of behaving is the public declaration that you reject it and have decided to stop having that belief or behaving in that way. The talks were… …   English dictionary

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